ECON 401v5: The Changing Global Economy Report a Broken Link

This course focuses on the economic aspects of globalization but recognizes that political, social, and cultural perspectives are also important. In ECON 401, you will examine the theory, evidence, and policies related to globalization. As a result, you will develop a critical understanding of globalization issues.

Note that, for Economist readings dated 2000 and later, we have linked you to the magazine's website so you can see any photos and/or figures that accompany the article. However, that website restricts you to viewing five articles per week without a subscription. We have provided links to alternate text-only databases for you to access if you exceed your maximum Economist usage.

Unit 1


Required Readings
Stiglitz, J. Making Globalization Work Nobel Prize-winning economist Joseph Stiglitz speaks about his book, "Making Globalization Work." This YouTube clip is a video recording of an event that took place on October 13, 2006, at Google's Mountain View, CA, headquarters as part of the Authors@Google series.
A Survey of Globalisation. The Economist. September 29, 2001. *Globalisation and its Critics *Profits over People *Is Government Disappearing? The link above opens to the Economist website, where you will find the assigned articles under the heading "Special Report: Globalisation" near the centre of the page. To view text-only versions of each reading, click on a title:
* Globalisation and its Critics
* Profits over People
* Is Government Disappearing?"
Huntington, Samuel P. The Clash of Civilizations. Foreign Affairs. Summer 1993. At the time of the writing, the author was the Eaton Professor of the Science of Government and Director of the John M. Olin Institute for Strategic Studies at Harvard University. This article is the product of the Olin Institute's project on "The Changing Security Environment and American National Interests."
Supplementary Readings
Bhagwati, Jagdish. Coping with Antiglobalization. Foreign Affairs, January/February 2002. Globalization is doomed to controversy thanks to a trio of misapprehensions. The opposition stems more from nostaligia and sterile theory than from economic reality.

Unit 2


Required Readings
Worldbeater, Inc. The Economist, November 22, 1997. Examines the role multinational corporations play in integrating the world's economies.

Unit 4


Required Readings
A Survey of Globalisation: Grinding the Poor. The Economist. September 29, 2001. The link above opens to the Economist website, where you will find the assigned article under the heading "Special Report: Globalisation" near the centre of the page. [Click Grinding the Poor to access text-only version.]

Download and read Chapter 1 PDF (under Light-weight Documents).

Download and read Chapter 2 PDF (under Light-weight Documents). READ ONLY pages 53-66.

The link above opens to the Economist website, where you will find the assigned articles under the heading "Special Report: Global Finance" near the centre of the page.  To view text-only versions of each reading, click on a title: "A Cruel Sea of Capital," "Catching the Tide," "Hot and Cold Running Money," "The Trouble with Banks," and "Sudden Storms."

A Survey of Globalisation. The Economist, September 29, 2001. * A Plague of Finance The link above opens to the Economist website, where you will find the assigned article under the heading "Special Report:  Globalisation" near the centre of the Economist web page. Click "A Plague of Finance" to access text-only version of the reading.
Bhagwati, J.  The Capital Myth: The Difference Between Trade in Widgets and Dollars. Foreign Affairs, May/June 1998.

Unit 5


Required Readings
A Survey of sub-Saharan Africa. The Economist. January 17, 2004. * First Get the Basics Right * The Rule of Big Men or the Rule of Law? * Breathing Life into Dead Capital * Coping with Conflict * Love and Death * Opportunities, Mostly Missed * An Addictive Lullaby * Africa’s Engine * Plenty of Mistakes to Learn From The link above opens to the Economist website, where you will find the assigned articles under the heading "Special Report: Sub-Saharan Africa" near the centre of the page. Read all nine articles in this survey.To view text-only versions of each reading, click on a title:
* First Get the Basics Right
* The Rule of Big Men or the Rule of Law?
* Breathing Life into Dead Capital
* Coping with Conflict
* Love and Death
* Opportunities, Mostly Missed
* An Addictive Lullaby
* Africa’s Engine
* Plenty of Mistakes to Learn From
Sachs, J. By Invitation: Doing the Sums on Africa. The Economist. May 22, 2004. Small amounts spent on promoting Africa's economy can save billions and make the West more secure. You will find the assigned article under the heading "By Invitation" in the centre column of the Economist web page. Read "Doing the Sums on Africa." Click Doing the Sums on Africa to view text-only version.
Africa: Special: The Heart of the Matter. The Economist, May 13, 2000. Africa's biggest problems stem from its present leaders, but they were created by African society and history. Click Special: The Heart of the Matter to view text-only source.
Supplementary Readings
A Survey of Globalisation. The Economist, September 29, 2001. * A Crisis of Legitimacy Click A Crisis of Legitimacy to view text-only version.