MAIS 616: Writing the Self Report a Broken Link

Compelling evidence exists that the writing process may enhance or expand personal development in a variety of contexts and that writing has therapeutic benefits. This course focuses on exploring these potentials, by engaging students in the writing process and by inviting them to review, study, discuss, and evaluate existing contexts where writing is being used for therapy, creativity, and self-expression, and for research on the writing process.

Week 1


These supplementary materials will be useful to you throughout the course.
Brodie, D. Writing Changes Everything: The 627 Best Things Anyone Ever Said about Writing. New York: St. Martin’s Press, 1997.
This book is not available from the Athabasca University Library.
Cerwinske, L. Writing as a Healing Art: The Transforming Power of Self–expression. New York: Perigee, 1999.
This book is not available from the Athabasca University Library.
Elbow, P. Writing without Teachers. New York: Oxford University Press, 1973.
This book is not available from the Athabasca University Library.
Hunt, Celia.

“Reading Ourselves: Imagining the Reader in the Writing Process.” In The Writing Cure: An Introductory Handbook of Writing in Counselling and Therapy, edited by G. Bolton, S. Howlett, C. Lago, and J. Wright, 35-43. London: Brunner/Routledge, 2004.

Use this form to request a print copy of this article from the AU Library.
Zinsser, W. Writing to Learn: How to Write and Think Clearly about any Subject at All. New York: Perennial Library, 1988.
This book is not available from the Athabasca University Library.

Week 7


Required Readings
Lengelle, Reinekke.  “Writing Towards Personal Development.”

Westword (January–February 2005): 7–8.

Week 13


Required Readings
Lengelle, Reinekke.  “Guest Editorial.”

Westword (March–April 2005): 2.

Lengelle, Reinekke.  “Reflections on Teaching Writing in Cyberspace.”

Westword (September–October 2004): 7–8.

Week 14


Required Readings