PSYC 210: Experiential Learning in the Celebration of Diversity Report a Broken Link

Psychology 210: Experiential Learning in the Celebration of Diversity employs a blend of adult learning theory, experiential learning theory, and transformative learning theory to engage the learner in a unique and participative set of learning experiences. As we increasingly interact with people from other countries, backgrounds, and cultures, increased awareness and celebration of cultural diversity can translate into more tolerance, respect, and appreciation for the uniqueness of all people and cultures. In this course, students will apply blended learning theories to a process involving “ambassadorship” roles in which students teach to and learn from someone who has a birth culture different from their own. This process, using “partnered ambassadors,” allows students to experience and celebrate cultural similarities as well as differences in a self-directed learning process.

Required Readings


Resource List 1


Experiential Learning Theory
There is a copy of the text available in the AU library and likely in any other university library that you have access to. You can complete the course and gain the theoretical knowledge required without having the text.
Learning from experience is a central philosophical and theoretical idea in the field of adult learning. In this paper, a theoretical model is discussed for viewing learning from experience in a more holistic manner.
Experiential learning cycles are models for understanding how the process of learning works. They are distinct from other models of learning, such as behavioural models or social learning models.
Discusses Kolb’s experiential learning model, his views on learning styles, and issues encountered with his model.

All learning is a subset of experiential learning. Learning also has a more particular meaning: learning-by-doing. [View as or download/save as a printable PDF document.]

Resource List 2


Transformative Learning Theory
There is a copy of the text available in the AU library and likely in any other university library that you have access to. You can complete the course and gain the theoretical knowledge required without having the text.
Article discusses Boyd’s view of transformative education. His theory focuses on the emotional and spiritual aspects of learning.
Renewed calls for a return to the basics swirl among constructivist claims for a discovery-oriented pedagogy. This struggle for meaning, the need to feel and be authentic with one another, and ourselves, and to realize a more just social order is the focus of several strands of research and theory referred to as transformative theories of adult learning.
Transformative Learning is a term that stems from Transformative Learning Theory (Mezirow, 1990, 1991, 2000), which describes a learning process of “becoming critically aware of one's own tacit assumptions and expectations and those of others and assessing their relevance for making an interpretation” (Mezirow, 2000, p. 4).
A defining condition of being human is that we have to understand the meaning of our experience. Facilitating such understandings is the cardinal goal of adult education.
Perhaps because the concept is so central to what adult education is all about, self-directed learning has been one of the field’s high-interest topics for more than a decade. Researchers, theorists, and practitioners have all asked the questions: What is self-directed learning? Who is engaged in it? What are the proper roles for educators and institutions wanting to provide it?

Resource List 3


Adult Learning Theory
There is a copy of the text available in the AU library and likely in any other university library that you have access to. You can complete the course and gain the theoretical knowledge required without having the text.
The education literature suggests that students who are actively engaged in the learning process will be more likely to achieve success. Once students are actively engaged in their own learning process, they begin to feel empowered and their personal achievement and self-direction levels rise.

Adult educators frequently speak of adult learning as if it were a discretely separate domain, having little connection to learning in childhood or adolescence. This claim is critically examined by exploring four major research areas (self-directed learning, critical reflection, experiential learning and learning to learn) each of which have been proposed as representing unique and exclusive adult learning processes.

Article discusses the definition and benefits of andragogy, andragogical assumptions about adults, the subject-centered university, individualization, and mass production.
Introducing technology into the curriculum means more than just “making it work.” The principles of adult learning theory can be used in the design of technology-based instruction to make it more effective. Malcolm Knowles’ theory of andragogy allows teachers/facilitators to structure lessons, which are part of a relevant learning environment for adult students.
The adult education literature generally supports the idea that teaching adults should be approached in a different way than teaching children and adolescents.
“Adults vote with their feet,” a favorite adage of adult educators, is frequently used to describe a characteristic of adult learners. In most circumstances, adults are not captive learners and, if the learning situation does not suit their needs and interests, they will simply stop coming.
In the situated learning approach, knowledge and skills are learned in the contexts that reflect how knowledge is obtained and applied in everyday situations. Situated cognition theory conceives of learning as a sociocultural phenomenon rather than the action of an individual acquiring general information from a decontextualized body of knowledge.
We don’t know a lot about the mechanisms of adult learning. Still, from a variety of sources there emerges a body of fairly reliable knowledge about adult learning—arbitrarily, 30 points that lend themselves to three basic divisions.

Resource List 4


Communication Skills
There is a copy of the text available in the AU library and likely in any other university library that you have access to. You can complete the course and gain the theoretical knowledge required without having the text.
Non-judgmental attitudes reflect one’s ability to not judge or criticize or to suspend judgment or criticism. Unconditional positive regard behaviours reflect one’s respect for, and acknowledgement of, the worth and value of the individual. While this site is intended as a brief overview of Roger’s person-centred therapy, the terms listed are also useful and important constructs for effective communicators.
Active listening techniques encourage the development of trust, acceptance, and rapport with the individual. This article discusses the various factors, which affect listening, and the many skills, which are required to be a good listener, e.g., eye contact, body posture, and focus and follow up.

Students are encouraged to pay special attention to the following sections: The Communication Process; Barriers to Communication; Basic Skills: Keys to Active Listening; and Appendix: A Short Case Example of Effective Communication.