HERM 334: Professional Ethics in Heritage Resources Management Report a Broken Link

PHIL / HERM 334: Professional Ethics in Heritage Resources Management examines the ways that ethical issues  and moral theories shape heritage practice. These issues are approached through an understanding of moral reasoning and of the various codes of practice that have been accepted as framing heritage practice. Beginning with the debate between professional specialists and generalists in this field, the course will move on to examine personal versus institutional ethics, cultural relativism, censorship, and conflicts of interest.

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Unit 1 What Is a Profession?


Reading Assignment


Barber, Bernard. “Some Problems in the Sociology of the Professions.” Daedalus 92 no. 4 (Fall 1963): 669–88.

Read pages 671–78, beginning at the section called "Toward a Definition of the Professions" and ending before the section "Professional Roles and Organizational Necessities."

Hughes, Everett C. “Professions.” Daedalus 92, no. 4 (Fall 1963): 655–68.
Illich, Ivan. Excerpt from “Useful Employment and its Professional Enemies.” In Toward a History of Needs, 23–36. Berkeley, CA: Heyday Books, 1978.

This pdf-article is downloadable only.

Van Mensch, Peter. “Museology as a Profession.” In Cahiers d’étude/Study Series 8. 20–21. ICOM International Committee for Museology, 2000.

Scroll down to page 21.

Unit 2 Heritage Resources Management and Ethical Codes


Reading Assignment


Cleere, Henry. “The World Heritage Convention in the Third World.” In Cultural Resource Management in Contemporary Society, edited by Francis P. McManamon and Alf Hatton, 99–106. London: Routledge, 2000.

Go To Page: 98

McManamon, Francis P., and Alf Hatton. “Introduction: Considering Cultural Resource Management in Modern Society.” In Cultural Resource Management in Contemporary Society, edited by Francis P. McManamon and Alf Hatton, 1–20. London: Routledge, 2000.

Go To Page: 0

O’Keefe, Patrick J. “Codes of Ethics: Form and Function in Cultural Heritage Management.” International Journal of Cultural Property 7, no. 1 (January 1998): 32–51.
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Unit 3 Moral and Ethical Principles for Heritage Resources Management: The Foundations of Ethical Practice


Reading Assignment


Almond, Brenda. “Rights.” In A Companion to Ethics, edited by Peter Singer, 259–69. Oxford: Blackwell Publishing, 1993.
Lynott, Mark. “The Development of Ethics in Archaeology.” In Ethical Issues in Archaeology, edited by Larry J. Zimmerman, Karen D. Vitelli, and Julie Hollowell-Zimmer, 17–27. Walnut Creek, CA: AltaMira Press, 2003. Reproduced with permission.
Ozar, David T. “Rights: What They Are and Where They Come From.” In Philosophical Problems: An Annotated Anthology, edited by Laurence Bonjour and Ann Baker, 640–55. Montreal: Pearson, 2005.
Pence, Greg. “Virtue Theory.” In A Companion to Ethics, edited by Peter Singer, 249–58. Oxford: Blackwell, 1993.
Rachels, James. “Subjectivism in Ethics.” In Philosophical Problems: An Annotated Anthology, edited by Laurence Bonjour and Ann Baker, 554–61. Montreal: Pearson, 2005.
Wylie, Alison. “On Ethics.” In Ethical Issues in Archaeology, edited by Larry J. Zimmerman, Karen D. Vitelli, and Julie Hollowell-Zimmer, 3–16. Walnut Creek, CA: AltaMira Press, 2003. Reproduced with permission.

Unit 4 Institutional versus Personal Ethics: Policies, Procedures, and Virtue Ethics


Reading Assignment


May, William F. “Professional Virtue and Self-Regulation.” In Ethical Issues in Professional Life, edited by Joan C. Callahan, 408–11. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1988.

This PDF article is downloadable only.

Nagel, Thomas. “Ruthlessness in Public Life.” In Ethical Issues in Professional Life, edited by Joan C. Callahan, 76–83. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1988.

This PDF article is downloadable only.

Shestack, Alan. “The Museum and Cultural Property: The Transformation of Institutional Ethics.” In The Ethics of Collecting: Whose Culture? Cultural Property: Whose Property? 2nd ed., edited by Phyllis Mauch Messenger, 93–101. Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press, 1999.

Scroll to page 9.

Unit 5 Legal, Cultural, and Ethical Responsibility: Cultural and Intellectual Property


Reading Assignment


Hillman Chartrand, Harry. “Intellectual Property in the Global Village.” Government Information in Canada/Information gouvernementale au Canada 1, no. 4.1 (1995): 1–12.
Kultgen, John. “The Ideological Use of Professional Codes.” In Ethical Issues in Professional Life, edited by Joan C. Callahan, 411–21. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1988.
Kymlicka, Will. “The Social Contract Tradition.” In A Companion to Ethics, edited by Peter Singer, 186–96. Oxford: Blackwell, 1993.
Milrad, Aaron, and Ella Agnew. “Copyright.” In The Art World: Law, Business and Practice in Canada, 1–19. Toronto: Merritt, 1980.
Phelan, Marilyn E. “Rights of Artists in Their Works.” In Museums and the Law, 83–93. Nashville, TN: American Association for State and Local History, 1982.
Seadle, Michael. “Whose Rules? Intellectual Property, Culture, and Indigenous Communities.” D Lib Magazine 8, no. 3 (March 2002): 1–10.

Unit 6 Standards of Ethics in Conservation and Heritage Management


Reading Assignment


Aplin, Graeme. “Some General Principles of Conservation and Management.” In Heritage: Identification, Conservation, and Management, 67–82. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2002.
Dolff-Bonekämper, Gabi. “Sites of Hurtful Memory.” Conservation 17, no. 2 (2002): 4–10. Los Angeles: Getty Conservation Institute.
Kaufman, Ned. “Historic Places and the Diversity Deficit in Heritage Conservation.” CRM: Journal of Heritage Stewardship 1, no. 2 (Summer 2004): 1–16. National Park Service, US Department of the Interior.
Malkogeorgou, Titika. “The Ethics of Conservation Practice: A Look from Within.” Victoria and Albert Museum Journal 52 (Spring 2006): 1–3.
Matero, Frank. “Ethics and Policy in Conservation.” Conservation 15, no. 1 (2000): 5–9. Los Angeles: Getty Conservation Institute.
Miri, Ali A. “Philosophy and Principles of Preservation in Practice.” CRM: The Journal of Heritage Stewardship 24, no. 7 (2001): 11–14.

Scroll to page 11.

Unit 7 Cultural Relavitism: Appropriation, Human Remains, and Indigenous "Others"


Reading Assignment


Havini, Moses. “Indigenous Perspective on Art Collection of Traditional Culture of the Past, Present and Future—Bougainville.” Presented at the UMAC ICOM Conference entitled Exposing and Exploiting the Distinct Character of University Museums and Collections, Sydney and Canberra, 2002.
Nichols, Deborah L., Anthony L. Klesert, and Roger Anyon. “Ancestral Sites, Shrines, and Graves: Native American Perspectives on the Ethics of Collecting Cultural Properties.” In The Ethics of Collecting: Whose Culture? Cultural Property: Whose Property? 2nd ed., edited by Phyllis Mausch Messenger, 27–38. Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press, 1998.
This PDF-article is downloadable only.
Rachels, James. “The Challenge of Cultural Relativism.” In Philosophical Problems: An Annotated Anthology, edited by Laurence Bonjour and Ann Baker, 546–54. Montreal: Pearson, 2005.
Smith, Claire, and Heather Burke. “In the Spirit of the Code.” In Ethical Issues in Archaeology, edited by Larry Zimmerman, Karen Vitelli, and Julie Hollowell-Zimmer, 177–97. Walnut Creek, CA: AltaMira Press, 2003. Reproduced with permission.
This PDF-article is downloadable only.
Thorley, Peter. “Current Realities, Idealised Pasts: Archaeology, Value and Indigenous Heritage Management in Central Australia.” Oceania 73, no. 2 (Dec. 2002): 1–16.

Unit 8 Feminist Ethics and Heritage Resources Management


Reading Assignment


Blau, Soren. “Out of Breathe? A Re-evaluation of the Use of Feminist Theory in Interpretations of Archaeology in Non-Western Countries.” World Archaeological Bulletin 11: 1–12.
Brennan, Samantha. “Reconciling Feminist Politics and Feminist Ethics on the Issue of Rights.” Journal of Social Philosophy 30, no. 2 (Summer 1999): 260–75.
Held, Virginia. “Feminist Transformations of Moral Theory.” Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 50, Supplement (Autumn 1990): 321–44.
Kok, Marjolijn. “Gender, Material Culture and Time.” In What Could a Feminist Art Currency Look Like? (September 2005): 1–8.

Reproduced with permission.

Unit 9 Censorship and Heritage Ethics


Reading Assignment


Berlin, Z. David. “Sense and Censorship.” Literary Review of Canada 8, no. 5 (June 2000): 18–22.
Burtch, Michael. “Censorship: A Case for Intellectual Freedom.” MUSE 6, no. 2 (Summer 1988): 10. Reproduced with permission of Canadian Museums Association.
Clarke, George Elliott. “From Onan to Lady Chatterley.” Globe and Mail, March 30, 2002, R3.
Clavir, Miriam. “Bill C-54—The Museum Community Must Define Its Position on Pornography and Eroticism.” Editorial. MUSE 6, no. 2 (Summer 1988): 2. Reproduced with permission of Canadian Museums Association.
Fitzpatrick, James F. “Museums and the Politically Correct Censorship and Funding.” MUSE (Spring 1992): 30–34.
Fraser, Andrea. “A ‘Sensation’ Chronicle.” Social Text 19, no. 2 (2001): 127–56.
Gubernick, Lisa. “Storm Brewing Over ‘Nazi’ Art Show.” Globe and Mail, January 11, 2002, R5.
Longino, Helen E. “Pornography, Oppression, and Freedom: A Closer Look.” In Morality and Moral Controversies: Readings in Moral, Social and Political Philosophy. 7th ed., edited by John Arthur, 534–39. Upper Saddle River, NJ. Pearson Prentice Hall, 2005.
Scorsone, Suzanne. “Is There a Balance in the Pornography Debate?” MUSE 6, no. 2 (Summer 1988): 7. Reproduced with permission of Canadian Museums Association.  
Wicclair, Mark R. “Feminism, Pornography, and Censorship.” In Morality and Moral Controversies: Readings in Moral, Social and Political Philosophy. 7th ed., edited by John Arthur, 540–44. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Prentice Hall, 2005.

Unit 10 Conflict of Interest, Looting, and Repatriation


Reading Assignment


Boardman, John. “Archaeologists, Collectors, and Museums.” In Who Owns Objects? The Ethics and Politics of Collecting Cultural Artifacts, edited by Eleanor Robson, Luke Treadwell, and Chris Gosden, 33–46. Oxford: Oxbow Books, 2006.
Hollowell-Zimmer, Julie. “Digging In the Dirt—Ethics and ‘Low-End Looting’.” In Ethical Issues in Archaeology, edited by Larry Zimmerman, Karen Vitelli, and Julie Hollowell-Zimmer, 45–55. Walnut Creek, CA: AltaMira Press, 2003. Reproduced with permission.
Koczka, Charles S. “The Need for Enforcing Regulations on the International Art Trade.” In The Ethics of Collecting Cultural Property: Whose Culture? Whose Property? 2nd ed., edited by Phyllis Mausch Messenger, 185–98. Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press, 1999.
Sullivan, Sharon. “Repatriation.” Conservation. The Getty Conservation Institute 14, no. 3 (1999): 18–21.

Unit 11 Stewardship, Heritage Discourse, and Justice


Reading Assignment


Jensen, Uffe Juul. “Cultural Heritage, Liberal Education, and Human Flourishing.” In Values and Heritage Conservation: Research Report, 38–43. Los Angeles: Getty Trust, 2000.

Go to page 42.

Lowenthal, David. “Stewarding the Past in a Perplexing Present.” In Values and Heritage Conservation: Research Report, 18–25. Los Angeles: Getty Trust, 2000.

Go to page 22.

Smith, Laurajane. “The Authorized Heritage Discourse and Its Use.” Excerpt from “The Discourse of Heritage.” In Uses of Heritage, 29–34. London: Routledge, 2006.

Go to page 28.

Smith, Laurajane. “Subaltern and Dissenting Heritage Discourses.” Excerpt from “The Discourse of Heritage.” In Uses of Heritage, 35–41. London: Routledge, 2006.

Go to page 34.

Waterton, Emma, Laurajane Smith, and Gary Campbell. “The Utility of Discourse Analysis to Heritage Studies: The Burra Charter and Social Inclusion.” International Journal of Heritage Studies 12, no. 4 (July 2006): 339–55.

Supplementary Readings