INST 470: Leadership of Indigenous Institutions and Organizations Report a Broken Link

This course introduces the historical and contemporary issues surrounding the development and re-development of Indigenous communities in Canada with a pragmatic emphasis on the operating factors that enable and define Indigenous leadership. 

Unit 1


Required Readings
Joseph Eliot Magnet, “Who Are the Aboriginal People of Canada?” in Dwight A. Dorey & Joseph E. Magnet (eds.), being Chapter 3 to Aboriginal Rights Litigation [Markham: Lexis Nexis - Butterworths], 2003 (68 pp.) Reproduced in the Reading File.
Introduction to Indigenous capacity for development: defining Indigenous peoples in Canada and Indigenous socio-economic conditions
Highlights from the Report of the Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples, Part IV: Perspectives and Realities, 1996, (17 pp.) Reading File available at: Introduction to Indigenous capacity for development: defining Indigenous peoples in Canada and Indigenous socio-economic conditions
Supplementary Readings
Eric Kades, “The Dark Side of Efficiency: Johnson v. M’Intosh and the Expropriation of American Indian Lands, 148 U. Pa. L. Rev. 1065 (2000). Academic Search Premier
Kathy Squadrito, Lock and the Dispossession of the American Indian, American Indian Culture and Research Journal 20:4, 145-181 (1996).
Introduction to Indigenous capacity for development: defining Indigenous peoples in Canada and Indigenous socio-economic conditions
Robert A. Williams Jr., The American Indian in Western Legal Thought: The Discourses of Conquest, [Oxford: Oxford University Press] (1993).
Introduction to Indigenous capacity for development: defining Indigenous peoples in Canada and Indigenous socio-economic conditions
Robert A. Williams Jr., Linking Arms Together: American Indian Visions of Law and Peace, 1600-1800, [Oxford: Oxford University Press] (1997).
Introduction to Indigenous capacity for development: defining Indigenous peoples in Canada and Indigenous socio-economic conditions
Vine DeLoria, Custer Died for Your Sins: an Indian Manifesto, [University of Oklahoma Press] Norman : University of Oklahoma Press, 1988.
Supplementary Resource

This is a long-standing resource link site operated by a full-time attorney in Toronto. It is a well-run site that is updated regularly and has hundreds of important links to Indigenous organizations around the world.

Supplementary Resource

A valuable comparative portal that provides numerous examples of multi-disciplinary field work. You may wish to bookmark this site as it will be a useful resource in several other units as well. It suffers only from a lack of Canadian content, however, there are at least three useful Canadian-based papers available.

Supplementary Resource

The online edition of the Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples is a must for book marking. Students should familiarize themselves with this document as it contains important statistical data that can be applied in this and other courses.

Unit 2


Required Readings
Stephen Cornell, “Exceptional Beginnings: The Fur Trade and Indian Labor (Chapter 2),” The Return of the Native: American Indian Political Resurgence [New York: Oxford University Press] (1988) (21 pp.). Reproduced in the Reading File.
Historical underpinnings and the causation of economic marginalization: the baggage of colonization
Wilbur R. Jacobs, “British Indian-White Relations: Edmond Atkin’s Scheme for Imperial Control (Chapter 5),” and “1763 – Year of the Decision on the Indian Frontier (Chapter 9),” Dispossessing the American Indian, [Norman: University of Oklahoma Press],(1985) (22 pp.) Reproduced in the Reading File.
Historical underpinnings and the causation of economic marginalization: the baggage of colonization
Fae L. Korsmo, “Claiming Memory in British Columbia: Aboriginal Rights and the State (Chapter 4),” [London: Altamira Press] in Troy R. Johson (ed.) Contemporary Native American Political Issues [London: Altamira Press], (1999) (15 pp.) Historical underpinnings and the causation of economic marginalization: the baggage of colonization

Unit 3


Required Readings
Larry N. Chartrand, “The Aboriginal Peoples’ Movement and its Critics (Chapter 15),” in Dwight A. Dorey & Joseph E. Magnet (eds.), Aboriginal Rights Litigation [Markham: Lexis Nexis - Butterworths], 2003 (25 pp.) Reproduced in the Reading File.
The role of Indigenous rights in the leadership of institutions and organizations
Patrick Macklem, 18th Annual Symposium: Indigenous Rights and Multinational Corporations and International Law, 24 Hastings Int’l & Comp. L. Rev. 475 (2001) (6pp). Reproduced in Reading File.
The role of Indigenous rights in the leadership of institutions and organizations
Patrick Macklem, “Distributing Sovereignty: Indian Nations and Equality of Peoples”, 45 Stan. L. Rev. 1311 (1993) (48 pp).
The role of Indigenous rights in the leadership of institutions and organizations

Unit 4


Required Readings
Alan Rugman, The End of Globalization, [New York: Amacon] 2000 (pp. 1-18) (18 pp.). Reproduce in the Reading File.
Micro-bursts in the Indigenous community: global trends that effect development and organizational decisions
R. v. Frank, 1999. Alta. D. Crim. J. 157, LEXIS 216 (Alta. Prov. Ct.) ( 16 pp.) Reproduced in the Reading File.
Micro-bursts in the Indigenous community: global trends that effect development and organizational decisions
Paul Barnsley, “High court puts Native rights in doubt” Windspeaker, July 2001. Available at: Micro-bursts in the Indigenous community: global trends that effect development and organizational decisions
S. James Anaya and Claudio Grossman, “The Case of Awas Tingni v. Nicaragua: A New Step in the International Law of Indigenous Peoples”, 19 Ariz. J. Int’l & Comp. Law 1 (2002) (15 pp.) . Available at: Micro-bursts in the Indigenous community: global trends that effect development and organizational decisions

Unit 5


Required Readings
Peter Edwards, “A Shot in the Dark (Chapter 1)” and “ The Neutral Nation (Chapter 2)”, in One Dead Indian: The Premier, The Police, and the Ipperwash Crisis, [Toronto: Stoddart] (2001). Reproduced in the Reading File (37 pp.).
Trust as a challenge to leadership: understanding cultural capital and Indigenous organizational behavior
Francis Fukuyama, “Social Capital and Civil Society”, IMF Working Paper WP/00/74 (21 pp.) Available at: Trust as a challenge to leadership: understanding cultural capital and Indigenous organizational behavior
Francis Fukuyama, “On the Human Situation at the End of History (Chapter 1)”, in Trust, [New York: Free Press Paperbacks] (1995) (32 pp.). Reproduced in the Reading File.
Trust as a challenge to leadership: understanding cultural capital and Indigenous organizational behavior
The Royal Bank of Canada Aboriginal Banking Services Group (2004) (approx 5 pp). Available at: Trust as a challenge to leadership: understanding cultural capital and Indigenous organizational behavior

Unit 6


Required Readings
Andrew Nikiforuk, “Canada’s New Oil Boom (Alberta’s fertile oil sands), 8/1/97 Can. Bus. 52 (8 pp.). Reproduced in Reading File.
Environmental considerations for Indigenous leaders, institutions and organizations
John Borrows, Living Between Water and Rocks: First Nations, Environmental Planning and Democracy, 47 Univ. of Toronto L.J. 417 (1997) (36 pp.). Reproduced in Reading File.
Environmental considerations for Indigenous leaders, institutions and organizations
Suncor Energey, “Aboriginal Affairs Policy", November 24, 1997 (3 pp.). Available at:
Environmental considerations for Indigenous leaders, institutions and organizations
“The Nature and Extent of Partnerships in the Aboriginal Forestry Industry (Part 3),”Aboriginal-Forest Sector Partnerships: Lessons for Future Collaborations”, prepared by the National Aboriginal Forestry Association and the Institute on Governance, June 2000 (approximately 20 pp.). Available at: Environmental considerations for Indigenous leaders, institutions and organizations

Unit 7


Required Readings
J.S. Frideres, “The Quest for Indian Development in Canada: Contrasts and Contradictions (Chapter 8),” John H. Moore (ed.) The Political Economy of North American Indians, [Norman and London: University of Oklahoma Press] (1993) (22 pp.). Reproduced in Reading File.
Case studies on Indigenous leadership and organizational responses in Canada
Max J. Hedley, “Autonomy and Restraint: The Household economy on a Southern Ontario Reserve (Chapter 9),” John H. Moore (ed.) The Political Economy of North American Indians, [Norman and London: University of Oklahoma Press] (1993) (29 pp.). Reproduced in Reading File.
Case studies on Indigenous leadership and organizational responses in Canada
Peter Edwards, “Falling Fast (Chapter 3)” and “Dudley’s Place (Chapter 4)”, in One Dead Indian: The Premier, The Police, and the Ipperwash Crisis, [Toronto: Stoddart] (2001). Reproduced in the Reading File (34 pp.).
Case studies on Indigenous leadership and organizational responses in Canada
Dwight A. Dorey, “The Future of Off-Reserve Aboriginal Peoples (Chapter 2),” in Dwight A. Dorey & Joseph E. Magnet (eds.), Aboriginal Rights Litigation [Markham: Lexis Nexis - Butterworths], 2003 (11 pp.) Reproduced in the Reading File.
Case studies on Indigenous leadership and organizational responses in Canada

Unit 8


Required Readings
John Borrows, “Stewardship and the First Nations Governance Act” 29 Queen's L.J. 103 (2003) (18 pp.). Reproduced in the Reading File.
Institutional and organizational responses to Indigenous leadership capacity
Osoyoos Band are vintage entrepreneurs, INAC (2006) Institutional and organizational responses to Indigenous leadership capacity
http://www.ainc-inac.gc.ca/nr/ecd/ssd/otm7_e.html
Turning Point, Aboriginal Leadership Institute Inc. (2004) (3 pp.). Available at: Institutional and organizational responses to Indigenous leadership capacity
“Aboriginal Training Programme in Museum Practices (ATPMP)”, The Canadian Museum of Civilization Corporation (2 pp.) (2004). Available at: Institutional and organizational responses to Indigenous leadership capacity
“Aboriginal Leadership Development Programs,” The Banff Centre (2004) (2 pp.) Available at: Institutional and organizational responses to Indigenous leadership capacity
“Aboriginal Labor Force Characteristics from the 1996 Census”, Indian and Northern Affairs, March 2001, (51 pp.) Available at: Institutional and organizational responses to Indigenous leadership capacity
“Income” being part of “Aboriginal Women: A Profile of the 1996 Census”, Indian and Northern Affairs, March 2001 (approx. 15 pp.). Available at: Institutional and organizational responses to Indigenous leadership capacity

Unit 9


Required Readings
Miriam Jorgensen and Jonathan B. Taylor, “What Determines Indian Economic Success?: Evidence from Tribal and Individual Indian Enterprises?” The Harvard Project on Native American Economic Development, Pub No. 00-3, June 2000, (16 pp). Available at: A comparative analysis: Native American development, capacity and governance in the United States
Stephen Cornell and Joseph P. Kalt, “Where’s the Glue? Institutional Bases of American Indian Economic Development.”, The Harvard Project on Native American Economic Development , Pub. No. 1-1, Feb. 1991, (60 pp.). Available at: A comparative analysis: Native American development, capacity and governance in the United States
Stephen Cornell and Jonathan Taylor , “An Analysis of the Economic Impact of American Indian Gaming on the State of Arizona”, The Udall Center for Studies in Public Policy, The University of Arizona, June 2001 (11 pp.). Available at:
A comparative analysis: Native American development, capacity and governance in the United States
Stephen Cornell and Joseph P. Kalt, “Reloading the Dice: Improving the Chances for Economic Development on American Indian Reservations (Chapter 1),” [Los Angeles: UCLA Press] (1995) (61 pp.). Reproduced in Reading File.
A comparative analysis: Native American development, capacity and governance in the United States

Unit 10


Required Readings
Jonodev Osceola Chaudhuri and Thomas LeClaire, “Fixing a Hole: Commercial Courts as a Tool for Tribal Economic Development”, Snell and Wilmer Law Office Publications (4 pages). Available at: Contemporary leadership in Indigenous Nations and future directions
Kintto Lucas, “Defending Indigenous Cultures Against Globalization”, Global Policy Forum 8 May 2001 (4 pages). Available at: Contemporary leadership in Indigenous Nations and future directions
Maude Barlow, “The Global Monoculture: ‘Free Trade’ Versus Culture and Democracy”, Global Policy Forum, Autumn 2001 (4 pages). Available at: Contemporary leadership in Indigenous Nations and future directions