GOVN /GLST/POLI 440: Global Governance and Law (Rev. C3/C3/C2) Report a Broken Link

This course provides an overview of the theoretical debates on law as governance in an increasingly globalized world. It examines the sources and practice of law and governance at the global level.

Unit 1: Governance, Governmentality, and Globalization


Duclos, M. (2020, March 24). Is COVID-19 a geopolitical game-changer? Institut Montaigne.
Koskenniemi, M. (2017). International law as “global governance.” In J. Desautels-Stein, & C. Tomlins (Eds.), Searching for contemporary legal thought (pp. 199–218). Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.
Krahmann, E. (2004). National, regional, and global governance: One phenomenon or many? Global Governance, 9(3), 323–346.
Roberts, D. (2010). Chapter 2: Global governance or global hegemony? Global governance and biopolitics: Regulating human security (pp. 27–47). Zed Books.

Unit 2: The Structure and Foundations of Global Governance


Avant, D., Finnemore, M., & Sell, S. (Eds.). (2010). Chapter 1: Who governs the globe?. Who governs the globe? (pp. 1–3). New York: Cambridge University Press.
Dingwerth, K. & Pattberg, P. (2006) Global Governance as a perspective on world politics. Global Governance, 12(2), 185–203.
Karns, M., Mingst, K., & Stiles, W. (2015). Chapter 2: The theoretical foundations of global governance. International organizations: The politics and processes of global governance (3rd ed.) (pp. 43–74). Boulder, CO: Lynne Rienner Publishers.
Murphy, C. (2005). Global Governance, poorly done and poorly understood. In C. Murphy (Ed.), Global institutions, marginalization, and development (pp. 133–146). London: Routledge.
Murphy, C. (2015). The last two centuries of global governance. Global Governance, 21(2), 189–196. 

Unit 3: The History and Evolution of International Law


Anghie, A. (2006). The evolution of international law: Colonial and postcolonial realities. Third World Quarterly, 27(5), 739–753.   
Margolin, J. (2019, June 14). Patriarchy, racism, and colonialism caused the climate crisis. TEDxYouth@Columbia [YouTube video].  
Miller, R. (2019). The doctrine of discovery: The international law of colonialism. The Indigenous Peoples’ Journal of Law, Culture & Resistance, 5(1), 35–42.
Von Stein, J. (2013). The engines of compliance. In J. Dunoff & M. Pollack (Eds.), Interdisciplinary perspectives on international law and international relations: The state of the art (pp. 477–501). Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.

Unit 4: The International Law and Global Governance Nexus


Koskenniemi, M. (2017). International law as “global governance.” In J. Desautels-Stein & C. Tomlins (Eds.), Searching for contemporary legal thought (pp. 199–218). Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.
Reus-Smit, C. (2004). Introduction. In C. Reus-Smit (Ed.), The politics of international law (pp. 1–13). Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.
Reus-Smit, C. (2004). The politics of international law. In C. Reus-Smit (Ed.), The politics of international law (pp. 14–44). Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.

Unit 5: Law and Ethics on the Use of Force


Heathcote, G. (2015). Feminist perspectives on the law on the use of force. In M. Weller (Ed.), The Oxford handbook of the use of force in international law (pp.114–128). Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press
Henderson, C. (2018). Chapter 1: The general breadth and scope of the prohibition of the threat or use of force. The use of force and international law (pp. 9–49). Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.
Lessafer, R. (2015). Too much history: From war as sanction to the sanctioning of war. In M. Weller (Ed.), The Oxford handbook of the use of force in international law (pp.114–128). Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.
Weller, M. (2015). International law and the problem of war. In M. Weller (Ed.), The Oxford handbook of the use of force in international law (pp. 3–34). Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.

Unit 6: International Institutions, Legal Instruments, and War


Bensouda, F. (2014). Gender justice and the ICC. International Feminist Journal of Politics, 16(4), 538–542.
Blok, S. (2019, December 2). The International Criminal Court must do better. Reforms are urgently needed. The Washington Post.
Schiff, B. (2008). Chapter 1: River of Justice. Building the international criminal court (pp. 14–41). Cambridge, MA: Cambridge University Press
Schiff, B. (2008). Chapter 2: Learning from the Yugoslavia and Rwanda Tribunals. Building the international criminal court (pp. 42–67). Cambridge, MA: Cambridge University Press.

Unit 7: Protecting and Promoting Human Rights


Abedi, M. (2019, November 2). Why a UN declaration on Indigenous rights has struggled to become Canadian law. Global News.
Freeman, M. (2011). Chapter 9: Human rights in the twenty-first century. Human rights: An interdisciplinary approach (2nd ed.) (pp. 201–211). Cambridge, UK: Polity Press.
Kew, D., Russell-Einhorn, M., & Rincon Villegas, A. (2018). Chapter 2: Rise of the global human rights regime: Challenging power with humanity. In E. Chowdhury & R. Srikanth (Eds.), Interdisciplinary approaches to human rights (pp. 35–49). Oxfordshire, UK: Routledge.
Sikkink, K. (2014). Latin American countries as norm protagonists of the idea of international human rights. Global Governance, 20(3), 389–404.

Unit 8: Environmental Governance


Betsill, M. (2007). Chapter 3: Environmental NGOs and the Kyoto Protocol negotiations: 1995 to 1997. In E. Corell & M. Betsill (Eds.). Ngo diplomacy: The influence of nongovernmental organizations in international environmental negotiations (pp. 43–66). Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.
Corell, E., & Betsill, M. (2007). Chapter 1: Introduction to NGO Diplomacy. In E. Corell & M. Betsill (Eds.). Ngo diplomacy: The influence of nongovernmental organizations in international environmental negotiations (pp. 1–17). Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.
Evans, J. (2012). Chapter 3: Institutions, rules, and actors. Environmental governance (pp. 45–75). London, UK: Routledge.
Hub Culture. (2020, January 24). Greta Thunberg and Fridays for future youth climate activists at Hub Culture ICEhouse in Davos [YouTube video].
Ivanova, M. (2013). The contested legacy of Rio+20. Global Environmental Politics, 13(4), 1–11.

Unit 9: Multilateral Economic Institutions and Global Social Movements


Campbell, K. & Doshi, R. (2020, March 18). The coronavirus could reshape global order: China is maneuvering for international leadership as the United States falters. Foreign Affairs.
Hutt, R. (2020, May 14). The economic effects of COVID-19 around the world. World Economic Forum.
Jalata, A. (2018). Reimagining global social movements in the perspective of egalitarian democracy. Humanity & Society, 42(1), 68–101.
Karns, M., Mingst, K., & Stiles, K. (2015). Chapter 8: Global economic governance. International organizations: The politics and processes of global governance (3rd ed.) (pp. 379–423). Boulder, CO: Lynne Rienner Publishers.
Maeckelbergh, M. (2014). Social movements and global governance. The Routledge companion to alternative organization (pp. 345–358). New York: Routledge.

Unit 10: The Global South: Post-Colonial and Decolonial Approaches to Governance


Adichie, C. (2009, October 9). The danger of a single story [YouTube video].
Harvey, D. (2007). Neoliberalism as creative destruction. The annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 610(1), 21–44.
Mignolo, W. (2011). Introduction: Coloniality. The darker side of western modernity: Global futures, decolonial options (pp. 1–24). New York: Duke University Press.
Mohanty, C. (1988). Under Western eyes: Feminist scholarship and colonial discourses. Feminist Review, 30, 61–88.
Quijano, A. (2007). Coloniality and modernity/rationality. Cultural Studies, 21(2–3), 168–178.