POLI 480: The Politics of Cyberspace Report a Broken Link

Political Science 480: The Politics of Cyberspace explores the emergence of the networked society, the information technology revolution, and the consequences for power, production, and culture as examined by such disciplines as political science, political economy, sociology, and communications. Throughout, the course views new information technologies as contested terrain that facilitates domination and resistance, fear and hope.

Unit 6


Required Readings
Supplementary Readings
Association for Progressive Communications (APC) (2007) See various web pages.
Council of Canadians (2007). See various pages and reports.
Global Trade Watch (2007). See various web pages.
Independent Media Centre (2007). See various web pages.
Institute for Global Communications (2007). See various web pages.
International Forum on Globalization (2007). See various web pages.
Oneworld.net (2007). See various web pages.
Third World Network (2007). See various web pages.
Harry Cleaver. “Zapatistas in Cyberspace, A Guide to Analysis and Information,” (2000).

Unit 7


Required Readings
Supplementary Readings
Parisi, Laura. “World Wide Web Reviews: Women and International Organizatons.”
Although we cannot provide a persistent url to this article, you can access it via the AU Library journal databases. Here is the full bibliographical reference: Parisi, Laura. 1999. "World Wide Web Reviews: Women and International Organizatons." Feminist Collections 20(4) (Summer): 11-12.

Unit 8


Required Readings
This site has been linked to information maintained by The UCLA Graduate School of Education & Information Studies at http://www.gseis.ucla.edu/.
Supplementary Readings
Norris, Pippa. "Democratic Divide: The Impact of the Internet on Parliaments Worldwide," (2000). This site has been linked to information maintained by Harvard University's John F. Kennedy School of Government at http://ksghome.harvard.edu.
Norris, Pippa. Harvard University Homepage (2007). This is an excellent site for students interested in communications, the internet and democracy. Resources online include draft chapters of the book above and the book Democratic Phoenix: Political Activism Worldwide. New York: Cambridge University Press. Also available is a course syllabus, “Internet Design for Democracy.”

This site has been linked to information maintained by Harvard University's John F. Kennedy School of Government at http://ksghome.harvard.edu.

Unit 9


Required Readings
http://archive.iprp.ischool.utoronto.ca/cracin/publications/pdfs/final/convergence_rethinking.pdf -- does not work
Supplementary Readings
Coleman, Stephen and Gotze, John.   Bowling Together: Online Public Engagement in Policy Deliberation. This online publication references a number of other government reports on e-democracy.

This site has been linked to information maintained by the book's authors at http://bowlingtogether.net/.
“Guidelines for the Content and Structure of Parliamentary Web sites.” Inter-Parliamentary Union (2000) Web Sites of National Parliaments.
Hansard Society (UK) (2007). The Hansard Society has number of very good reports on e-democracy and parliament online.

Unit 10


Required Readings
This site has been linked to information maintained by Sage Journals Online at http://hij.sagepub.com.

Unit 11
Supplementary Readings


Association for Progressive Communications (APC) (2007). See various web pages.
Independent Media Centre (2002). See various web pages.
Institute for Global Communications (2007). See various web pages.
International Forum on Globalization (2007). See various web pages.
Oneworld.net (2007). See various web pages.
Third World Network (2007). See various web pages.

Harry Cleaver.   “Zapatistas in Cyberspace, A Guide to Analysis and Information.” (2000).