MDDE 603: Foundations of Instructional Design: Systems Analysis and Learning Theory Report a Broken Link

Unit 1


Part 1
Schunk, D. H. (2012). Learning theories: An Educational Perspective (6th. ed.). Upper Saddle Hill, NJ: Pearson Education, Inc. Chapter 1: Introduction to the Study of Learning, pp. 1 - 28.
The above link is a download of the Schunk book.
Part 2
Pratt, D. D. (n.d.). Ten simple steps for interpreting your TPI profile (pdf).
Pratt, D. D. (2002). Good teaching: one size fits all? (pdf) In J. Gordon (Ed.), An update on teaching theory. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass Publishers. (pdf)

Unit 2


Schunk, D. H. (2012). Learning theories: An Educational Perspective (6th. ed.). Upper Saddle Hill, NJ: Pearson Education, Inc. Chapter 3: Behaviorism, pp. 71 - 116.
The above link is a download of the Schunk book.
B. F. Skinner Foundation (n.d.). Brief biography of B. F. Skinner. B. F. Skinner Foundation. Cambridge, MA.
Polson, D. (2000a). Fred S. Keller and the personalized system of instruction. Retrieved November 12, 2002 from Athabasca University: Canada's Open University, Centre for Psychology website.
Grant, L. K., & Spencer, R. E. (2003). The personalized system of instruction: Review and applications to distance education. International Review of Research on Open and Distance Learning, 4(2).
Pear, J. J. (2002). Teaching and researching higher-order thinking in virtual environment. Slideshow of course using University of Manitoba Computer-Aided Personalized System of Instruction (CAPSI).
Edutech Wiki. Programmed instruction.
The Keller Plan (also called The Personalized System of Instruction) is an instructional method introduced by Fred Keller, J. Gilmour Sherman, and several other researchers in the 1960s.This individualized learning method was oriented on improvement of high school learning.

Unit 3


Driscoll, M. P. (2005). Meaningful learning and schema theory (pdf). In Psychology of learning for instruction, 3rd ed., Boston: Pearson Education, Inc.: pp. 111-152. (pdf)
Schunk, D. H. (2012). Learning theories: An Educational Perspective (6th. ed.). Upper Saddle Hill, NJ: Pearson Education, Inc. Chapter 5: Information Processing Theory, pp. 163 - 227.
The above link is a download of the Schunk book.
Schunk, D. H. (2012). Learning theories: An Edu cational Perspective (6th. ed.). Upper Saddle Hill, NJ: Pearson Education, Inc. Chapter 6: Constructivism (Piaget's Theory of Cognitive Development), pp. 236 - 240.
The above link is a download of the Schunk book.
Schunk, D. H. (2012). Learning theories: An Educational Perspective (6th. ed.). Upper Saddle Hill, NJ: Pearson Education, Inc. Chapter 7: Cognitive Learning Processes, pp. 278- 344.
The above link is a download of the Schunk book.
Schunk, D. H. (2012). Learning theories: An Educational Perspective (6th. ed.). Upper Saddle Hill, NJ: Pearson Education, Inc. Chapter 10: Development, pp. 456 - 462.
The above link is a download of the Schunk book.
Hmelo-Silver, C. E., & Pfeffer, M. G. (2004). Comparing expert and novice understanding of a complex system from the perspective of structures, behaviors, and functions. Cognitive Science, 28(1), 127 – 138. (pdf)

Unit 4


Schunk, D. H. (2012). Learning theories: An Educational Perspective (6th. ed.). Upper Saddle Hill, NJ: Pearson Education, Inc. Chapter 6: Constructivism, (pp. 228 - 277).
The above link is a download of the Schunk book.
Mayer, R. E. (1999). Designing instruction for constructivist learning. In C. M. Reigeluth (Ed.), Instructional design theories and models: A new paradigm of instructional theory (pp. 50-67). Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. (pdf)
Kanuka, H., & Anderson, T. (1999). Using constructivism in technology-mediated learning: Constructing order out of the chaos in the literature. Radical Pedagogy, 1(2), 2-39.
Brent, D., & Sumara, D. (2002). Constructivist discourses and the field of education: Problems and possibilities. Educational Theory, 52(4), 409-428.
Baviskar, S. N., Hartle, R. T. & Whitney, T. (2009). Essential criteria to characterize constructivist teaching: Derived from a review of the literature and applied to five constructivist-teaching methods articles. International Journal of Science Education, 31(4), 541 – 550. (pdf)
Kirschner, P. A., Sweller, J,. & Clark, R. E. (2006). Why minimal guidance during instruction does not work. Educational Psychologist, 41(2), 75-86.

Unit 5


Schunk, D. H. (2012). Social Cognitive Theory (Chapter 4). Learning theories: An Educational Perspective, (pp. 137-162). Upper Saddle Hill, NJ: Pearson Education, Inc. (pp. 137-162).
The above link is a download of the Schunk book.
Schunk, D. H. (2012). Motivation (Chapter 8). Learning theories: An Educational Perspective, (pp. 345 - 398). Upper Saddle Hill, NJ: Pearson Education, Inc.
The above link is a download of the Schunk book.
Keller, J. (n.d.). The ARCS model of Motivational Design. Available at Keller's ARCS Website.
Keller, J. (2008). An integrative theory of motivation, volition, and performance. Technology, Instruction, Cognition & Learning, 6(2),79 - 104.
Lui, W. C., Wang, C. K. J., Kee, Y. H., Koh, C., Lim, B. S. C. & Chua, L. (2014). College students’ motivation and learning strategies, profiles and academic achievement: A self-determination theory approach.  Educational Psychology: An International Journal of Experimental Educational Psychology, 34(3), pp. 338 - 353.

Unit 6


Bransford, J. D., Brown, A. L., & Cocking, R. R. (1999). Mind and Brain, (Chapter 5). In How people learn: Brain, mind, experience and school. Washington, D.C.: National Academy Press.
Introduction to VARK: Do you know how you learn? VARK: A guide to learning styles.
Schunk, D. H. (2012). Neuroscience of Learning (Chapter 2). Learning theories: An Educational Perspective, (pp. 29 - 70). Upper Saddle Hill, NJ: Pearson Education, Inc.
The above link is a download of the Schunk book.
Schunk, D. H. (2012). Learning Styles, (Chapter 10). Learning theories: An Educational Perspective (pp. 478 - 482). Upper Saddle Hill, NJ: Pearson Education, Inc.
The above link is a download of the Schunk book.

Unit 7


Banathy, B. H. (1995). The evolution of systems inquiry (Part 1).
Banathy, B. H., & Jenlink, P. M. (1996). Systems inquiry and its application in education. In D. H. Jonassen (Ed.), Handbook of Research on Educational Communications and Technology. AECT Publications. Sections 3.2 – 3.2.10
Cookson, P. (1998). Settings for distance education: A comparative study of two organizational systems. Athabasca, AB: Athabasca University. (Word docx)
Daniel, T. A. (2005). Applications of a systems approach to distance education. ResearchGate.net.
Naughton, J. (1984). Soft systems analysis: An introductory guide. Milton Keynes, UK: Open University.
Rohs. F. R., & Navarro, M. (2008). Soft systems methodology: An intervention strategy. Journal of International Agriculture and Extension Education, 15(3), pp. 95-98. (pdf)
Turner, D. M. (2008). Using Mode 2 soft systems methodology in the teaching and assessment of the “practical” content in undergraduate hospitality degrees. Journal of Hospitality, Leisure, Sport and Tourism Education, 7(2), 34-44. (pdf)
Walton, D. C. (2004).  Modeling organizational systems: Banathy’s three lenses revisited. Systemic Practice and Action Research 17,(4), pp. 265-284.
Video:

Fishwick, P. Systems Theory.

Lancaster Management. Peter Checkland on the origins of SSM.